All about fruitarianism with a long-term fruitarian, Lena

My friend saved a tree, which someone had thrown out almost without roots, by planting it in his garden, and sent me another email update with "Poor tree" in the subject.

Trees are living organisms. This tree was recently cut in my area just because it belonged to a species with supposedly invasive roots.

This is a photograph of the tree now. Below you can see how it looked before.

Our Dialogue Today

Friend:
Only one tiny living twig left (but I still have hope for next year)...

Lena (me):
Oooh.

Friend:
Yes, I've been reading what tree experts write about root damage and there is no way this little tree will survive.  Its roots were almost all gone. :-(
But I'm not giving up till next spring.  Maybe the experts are wrong.  Maybe it can grow some new shoots...

Lena:
In my area a gorgeous tree was cut down just because it had potentially invading roots. I pass it on my runs, the roots are still there... I am making a painting with it.

Friend:
That sort of thing disgusts me.  When I wrote "root damage" I meant damage (injury) to the roots themselves, not damage caused by roots. I doubt roots do any damage to damn people - but I'm sure there is much more written about that subject than about the injury we cause to roots!

Lena:
I know, what you ment. They were afraid about pipes under the ground. The whole thing pains me: no distinguishing between plant organisms and inanimate objects - the healthy tall tree was treated like a stone, or rather like dirt.

Friend:
I know. Pains me too...

Initial Short Story, December 2016

Friend:

It's a long story - I saved and planted an almost dead tree today (the neighbors ripped it out and dumped it in pile).  It may not survive (hardly any roots left and many branches already brown) but at least now it has a chance. It's a blue spruce. (This is not mine). Wish my Xmas tree luck!  I has a tough battle ahead. :-(

Lena:

Oh, I hope it makes it! So beautiful!

Friend:

I'll take a picture of the poor thing tomorrow.  I'm worried it has too little roots left, but it's a good size... Maybe...

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Percy Bysshe Shelley

They are called into existence by human artifice that they may drag out a short and miserable existence of slavery and disease, that their bodies may be mutilated, their social feelings outraged. It were much better that a sentient being should never have existed, than that it should have existed only to endure unmitigated misery.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, or ascorbate, is an essential nutrient for humans, a water-soluble vitamin. Humans, unlike most animals, are unable to synthesize vitamin C, so it is an essential dietary component. 

  • Vitamin C is required for the biosynthesis of collagen (an essential component of connective tissue), L-carnitine, and certain neurotransmitters, it is also involved in protein metabolism.
  • Vitamin C is also an important physiological antioxidant and has been shown to regenerate other antioxidants within the body, including alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E). Vitamin C regenerates vitamin E by reducing vitamin E radicals formed when vitamin E scavenges the oxygen radicals. 
  • Vitamin C plays an important role in immune function and improves the absorption of nonheme iron, the form of iron present in plant-based foods.

Approximately 70%–90% of vitamin C is absorbed at moderate intakes of 30–180 mg a day. At doses above 1 g a day, absorption falls to less than 50% and absorbed, unmetabolized ascorbic acid is excreted in the urine. 

Insufficient vitamin C intake causes scurvy, which is characterized by fatigue or lassitude, connective tissue weakness, and capillary fragility.

Cells accumulate vitamin C. The total body content of vitamin C ranges from 300 mg (at near scurvy) to about 2 g.

  • High levels of vitamin C are maintained in cells and tissues, and are highest in leukocytes (white blood cells), eyes, adrenal glands, pituitary gland, and brain.
  • Relatively low levels of vitamin C are found in extracellular fluids, such as plasma, red blood cells, and saliva.

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